Everyday Champagne | Patagonia
439
archive,category,category-patagonia,category-439,ajax_fade,page_not_loaded,,select-theme-ver-2.3,wpb-js-composer js-comp-ver-4.5.3,vc_responsive
feature

Patagonia Sur

We had already driven nearly three hours when we hit the rough gravel outside of El Chalten. Ugh, we have to almost be there. Gonzo (a nickname), our driver, turned around and said, “It’s about another hour, and I’m sorry, but the road is really bumpy.”

 

Now we were getting a bit crabby, but hey, it’s the start of our vacation adventure. Bumpy, however, was not the right word. It was like driving through a tank trap. But we finally arrived at the boat dock, to the smiling faces of our awaiting boat. Then Gonzo promptly threw my luggage in the lake (accidentally) while trying to heave it on the boat. (It was retrieved after a minute or so.)

 

After a 10-minute boat ride, we arrived at our lodge’s boat dock on the other side of Lago Desierto as it started to spit rain. We walked quickly up the hill to be greeted by more smiling faces for a quick tour of the beautiful lodge.

 

We then started to hear things like eco-friendly, no power these hours, no hot water these hours, put all trash (even bathroom and toilet trash) in garbage, blah, blah, blah, and, oh, yeah, no WiFi.

 

“Wait, what?” we both said.

 

Following came an explanation about location, access, power, blah, blah, blah. Come on, they get WiFi on the moon.

 

We got to our room, looked at each other and I said, “We just drove 110 hours and feel like we just got out of a clothes dryer, arrived here to find limited power, water and no WiFi, and they threw my luggage in the water. What the hell did we book? Are we camping?”

 

Guess what? It was one of the best hotel experiences of our extensive travels. Typical spoiled Americans.

READ MORE